Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Black Leadership addresses NOM's Race Baiting Tactics


African American Ministers Leadership Council
“If the success of the National Organization of Marriage’s movement depends on stirring up resentment between communities, it might want to rethink its strategies.

“African American men and women of faith are not a political football to be tossed around in a cynical game of resentment and division. We, like all Americans, struggle thoughtfully with issues of faith, family and politics. Anti-equality activists such as NOM consistently attempt to use a deeply cynical ‘wedge’ strategy to divide African Americans and the gay community, playing up what are now old and tired cliches. In the long run, this strategy will falter as African American and LGBT communities continue to work together for equal justice.

 “I celebrate as more and more African American clergy engage in AAMLC’s Healing Grace dialogues and work to confront and overcome stigma, prejudice and homophobia in the Black Church. We continually seek to help and not harm, love and not hate, reconcile and not separate, unite and not divide -- and it's working.

“NOM’s explicit attempt to drive a wedge between the LGBT community and African Americans is deeply offensive, and it exposes the depravity of their politics.”

Julian Bond - Former NAACP President
 "NOM's underhanded attempts to divide will not succeed if Black Americans remember their own history of discrimination. Pitting bigotry's victims against other victims is reprehensible; the defenders of justice must stand together."

3 comments:

Roger Poladopoulos said...

Now that NOM is caught with their panties down around their ankles, hopefully the world will see them for what they really are: anything BUT family-oriented. How do you spell National Organization for Marriage? D-E-C-E-I-T! Hooray for the African-American clergy and Mr. Julian Bond for speaking the truth!

truthspew said...

This is good to see. I have long known NOM was playing this tactic. And sure, there are some black pastors, like Jackson et al who deserve scorn but it isn't because of their color, but their character in pushing a denial of rights for another group.

tamayn said...

It's a shame that they really were that naive to think that communities would stand to be manipulated like that. I think they've got something to come back from, but conservatives seem to bounce back quicker.